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Golfer wins unfair dismissal claim after being accused of telling colleague ‘you smell so good I could lick you all over’

In the case of Mr MS v Cambridge Country Club Ltd a golfer was sacked from a country club after being wrongly accused of telling a junior female colleague ‘you smell so good I could lick you all over’.

In the case of Mr MS v Cambridge Country Club Ltd a golfer was sacked from a country club after being wrongly accused of telling a junior female colleague ‘you smell so good I could lick you all over’.

Mr MS was fired from his job at the exclusive club after he was alleged to have made ‘unwanted advances of a sexual nature’ to front-of-house staff Ms AC.

He was invited to a disciplinary hearing where he also faced allegations that he messaged Ms AC inappropriately at 11pm and joked that a colleague looked like Jimmy Savile.

Now, a tribunal has ruled he was sacked unfairly after finding he did not actually make the ‘lick you’ comment or the remark about sex predator Savile.

Mr MS is in line to receive compensation from Cambridge Country Club after suing them for unfair and wrongful dismissal.

However, it will be reduced as the tribunal ruled he acted inappropriately by messaging Ms AC late at night asking her ‘how do you manage to look so good everyday?’

Employment Judge Kerrie Hunt said: ‘I conclude that the club did not carry out a reasonable and sufficient investigation.

‘The allegations were categorised as gross misconduct with serious consequences for Mr MS.

‘There were some basic yet fundamental details of the allegations against Mr MS that [Mr M] did not make enquiries about or further investigate the details, including the time and date and potential witnesses of the ‘lick you’ comment.

‘I consider that the decision to dismiss was not a fair sanction within the range of reasonable responses that a reasonable the employer would take.’

The judge ruled that Mr MS did message Ms AC which was inappropriate.

‘I find that his explanation that he meant no innuendo and was referencing that she was well turned out and smart at work did not mitigate or excuse his conduct in sending a private message late at night.

‘I further find that his inability or unwillingness to accept or acknowledge that receiving such a message, notwithstanding his intention, from a senior colleague late at night whilst at home, may be inappropriate and make Ms AC feel uncomfortable, exacerbates the offence.’

The judge said a final written warning would have been more appropriate.

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