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Age discrimination embedded in society according to DWP research

Age-related discrimination and stereotypes are firmly embedded in British society and their scope is wide ranging according to research carried out by the Department for Work and Pensions

Attitudes to Age in Britain 2010-11 sets out the findings of research carried out by the Department for Work and Pensions, based on an opinion survey involving 2,000 nationally representative respondents. The research shows that Britain’s ageing population poses a significant challenge for strategies to deal with the social and economic changes ahead. The findings show that, overall, age-related discrimination and stereotypes are firmly embedded in British society and their scope is wide ranging. Among the key findings are: (i) the perception that youth ends at 41 and old age starts at 59; (ii) 80% of respondents reported that age discrimination is “fairly or very serious”; (iii) 34% of respondents reported that they had been shown some prejudice in the last year because of their age; and (iv) perceptions towards those aged over 70 are more positive than towards those in their 20s, i.e. older people are friendlier, more moral and more competent than people in their 20s.

Later this year the Employment Team will be running a free breakfast seminar on the challenges of managing an age diverse workforce. Look out for further details.

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