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Jim Lythgow
   

Eyecare: communication and awareness

Eye care enables the early detection and monitoring of serious health conditions like diabetes and high blood pressure, and also helps with more minor ailments like headaches and migraine. It can, therefore, help towards improved health and wellbeing in the workplace, which in turns supports productivity and morale, but for businesses to benefit, the employees need to understand the offering and its advantages.

Article by 11 April 2019

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Perceptions of wellbeing – looking to the future

What if this was coping strategy for managing stress or anxiety? Would it then become acceptable? Fifty years ago if you saw someone running down the street you’d likely think “what have they nicked or who are they chasing?” Today when we see someone running down the street we know it's someone investing in their physical fitness. So, 50 years form now, will taking a minute to practice mindfulness in work become acceptable? I really hope so!

Article by 9 April 2019

Kenneth Freeman
   

Office interior design trends to look out for in 2019

Last year, Ambius research revealed that on average British workers spend more time per a day at their desk or workstation (6.8 hours) than they do in bed (6.4 hours). These figures reinforce the importance of making sure offices are happy, agile and comfortable places to work.

Article by 19 February 2019

Jim Lythgow
   

The eyes have it – clear vision on wellbeing

Eye care can have a positive impact not just on an employee’s eyesight and eye health, but can have wider benefits such as boosting morale and productivity. We recently conducted research into this area to assess the extent that HRs value this benefit and how much they believe their staff do too.

Article by 22 January 2019

Louisa Weinstein
   

Pre-empting the Health and Safety risk of everyday conflict at work

Although the holiday period is, for many, a joyful and deeply fulfilling time of year, we know that for many, it can be an extremely challenging and even lonely time.  As the holiday period approaches, staff most keenly affected by conflict are generally those working in client facing roles.  Some will regularly be working with people who are under the influence of drugs or alcohol.  Equally they might just be under extreme pressure either personal or professional to “get things done” or “meet targets” before Christmas.  This presents dangers not only to the physical safety in the event of often erratic behaviour but also to the mental health of front-line staff. 

Article by 18 December 2018