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Do flexible working policies lead to a two-tier workforce?

Two-tier workforces are not a new phenomenon, but how it’s defined in today’s economy is. In the past, the two-tier workforce was characterized by differences between white and blue-collar workers. Now, the two-tier workforce can be seen in the differences between those who have access to flexible working arrangements and those who do not.

A two-tier workforce has always existed in some extent, it’s not a new phenomenon. In the past, the two-tier workforce has been characterized by differences in pay, benefits, and working conditions between highly-skilled, white-collar workers and less-skilled, blue-collar workers.

However, in today’s economy, the two-tier workforce can also be seen in the differences between workers who have access to flexible working arrangements and those who do not, and in the disparities in compensation and career advancement opportunities between these two groups of workers.

Creating an equitable and inclusive workforce is not just a moral or ethical responsibility but also a business imperative. A two-tier workforce can lead to a high turnover rate, reduced employee engagement, and a negative impact on the company’s reputation, all of which can have a significant impact on the bottom line. Additionally, providing flexibility and opportunity for all employees, regardless of their job type or level, can help companies to attract and retain top talent, which can lead to increased productivity and innovation.

Employers should also consider that providing flexibility to some employees while not providing it to others, can also lead to resentment, lack of trust and a negative work environment. Furthermore, it’s important to ensure that the flexibility provided is not just an option but a mandatory one, in order to avoid discrimination and bias.

Do flexible working policies lead to a two-tier workforce?

Flexible working policies, such as the four-day working week, could potentially lead to a two-tier workforce if they are not implemented in an equitable manner. If only certain employees, such as knowledge workers or those on larger salaries, are given the option to work a shorter week, it could create a divide between them and other workers who may not have the same level of flexibility or compensation. To avoid creating a two-tier workforce, it would be important to ensure that any flexible working policies are available to all employees, regardless of their job type or salary level, and that compensation is adjusted accordingly to ensure fairness. Additionally, organizations may need to ensure that all employees have the ability to access flexible working options as well as the necessary infrastructure and support to work remotely or on a flexible schedule.

3 signs that a two-tier workforce is developing

The signs that a two-tier workforce is developing can include:

1. Unequal access to flexible working arrangements: If certain employees or groups of employees are given more opportunities to work from home or have flexible schedules, while others are not, this can indicate a two-tier workforce.

2. Disparities in compensation: If employees who have access to flexible working arrangements also have higher salaries or benefits, this can further indicate a two-tier workforce.

3. Limited career advancement opportunities for non-traditional workers: If employees who do not have access to flexible working arrangements have limited opportunities for career advancement, this can indicate a two-tier workforce.

The dangers of a two-tier workforce

If a two-tier workforce develops further, it could have a number of negative consequences for both employees and employers. Some potential impacts include:

1. Decreased morale and engagement: Employees who feel that they are being treated unfairly or that they have limited opportunities for advancement may become demotivated and disengaged in their work.

2. Increased turnover:
Employees who feel that they are not being treated fairly may be more likely to leave the organization, leading to increased recruitment and training costs for the employer.

3. Decreased productivity: Employees who feel that they are being treated unfairly may be less productive, leading to decreased overall productivity for the organization.

4. Increased discrimination: A two-tier workforce can also lead to discrimination, where certain employees are treated differently based on factors such as job type, salary level, or access to flexible working arrangements.

5. Damage to Employer’s reputation: A two-tier workforce can also damage the employer’s reputation and make it difficult for them to attract and retain top talent.

Industries most at risk

Different industries may have varying levels of risk for having unhappy workers with little flexibility. Some industries that may be more at risk include:

1. Retail and hospitality: Many employees in these industries are required to work during non-traditional hours, such as evenings and weekends, and may have limited opportunities for flexible working arrangements.

2. Manufacturing and construction: Workers in these industries may have limited opportunities for remote work and may be required to work at a specific location.

3. Service-based industries: Employees in these industries may have limited opportunities for remote work and may be required to interact with customers during specific hours.

4. Healthcare: Many health care workers may have limited opportunities for remote work and may be required to work long shifts or be on call.

5. Public services: Many public services workers may have limited opportunities for remote work and may be required to work during specific hours.

Any industry can have employees with limited flexibility and unhappy workers. Employers should regularly monitor their policies and practices for any signs of bias or discrimination and take steps to address any issues that arise. Additionally, Employers should consider providing opportunities for flexible working arrangements to all employees, regardless of their job type or level, in order to ensure a fair and equitable workplace.

How to create flexibility in ‘deskless’ jobs

There are several ways that employers can create more flexibility in deskless jobs, some of which include:

  • Flexible scheduling: Offering flexible scheduling options, such as part-time or shift-based work, can allow employees to balance their work and personal commitments. This can be especially beneficial for employees with caregiving responsibilities or for those who have other commitments outside of work.
  • Remote work options: Investing in technology and infrastructure that allows deskless workers to telecommute or work remotely can provide them with more flexibility in their jobs. This can include things like providing employees with laptops or smartphones, or providing them with access to remote work platforms and tools.
  • Job sharing: Allowing employees to share a full-time position can also provide them with more flexibility in their jobs. Job sharing can allow employees to work part-time hours while still receiving full-time benefits and compensation.
  • Training and development: Providing employees with training and development opportunities can also provide them with more flexibility in their jobs. This can include things like offering on-the-job training, cross-training employees in multiple areas, and providing employees with opportunities to advance their careers.
  • Employee engagement and communication: Regularly engaging with employees and encouraging open communication can help employers to identify and address any barriers to flexibility that employees may be facing.

The most effective way to create more flexibility in deskless jobs is by working closely with employees to understand their specific needs and concerns, and by being open to new ideas and approaches. Employers should also consider the cost of implementing flexibility and find ways to make it affordable.

Creating an equitable and inclusive workforce

It’s essential to recognize that flexibility can mean different things to different people and it’s important to offer a range of options to suit different employees’ needs. Employers should understand that flexibility is not only remote work, but also includes flexible schedule, job sharing and part-time options, and should be willing to be creative and open-minded in finding ways to offer flexibility to all employees.

Ensuring that the workforce is not tiered and opportunities are equal is the responsibility of both employers and employees.

From the employer’s perspective, it is their responsibility to create and maintain an equitable and inclusive workplace. This includes implementing policies and practices that are fair and non-discriminatory, providing equal opportunities for career advancement, and regularly monitoring and addressing any issues that may arise. Employers also have a responsibility to create an environment where employees feel comfortable discussing their needs and concerns, and actively work to address any barriers to flexibility that employees may be facing.

From the employee’s perspective, it is their responsibility to advocate for themselves and to speak up if they feel that they are being treated unfairly or that they have limited opportunities for advancement. Employees also have a responsibility to understand and comply with company policies and to take advantage of any opportunities that are available to them.

Creating an equitable and inclusive workforce is a shared responsibility and requires an ongoing effort from both employers and employees. Employers should work closely with employees to understand their specific needs and concerns, and employees should be willing to speak up and advocate for themselves.

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