search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
the loNg-term effects F Caer


When you think of cancer, you may not think of it as a long-term condition. However 65% of cancer survivors say they’ve had to deal with long-term side effects during and after treatment. These long-term effects – such as persistent hair loss, depression, fatigue, nausea and loss of confi dence – can impact their everyday lives, including at work.


Each year, almost 120,000 people of working age are diagnosed with cancer in the UK, and with survival rates improving and people retiring later, this fi gure is set to rise. 85% of people in work when they were diagnosed with cancer say that continuing work is important to them. However, 47% of people had to give work up or change roles, highlighting the importance of ensuring that the right support and advice is available early on to prevent staff falling out of work.


However despite the need for this support, line managers are often ill equipped to offer the right level of information to help manage employees affected by cancer.


Organisations urgently need to develop a health and wellbeing at work strategy that recognises the needs of rising numbers of employees with long-term conditions. This is why Macmillan has developed Macmillan at Work, which offers workplace training, consultancy and resources to help HR and line managers support people affected by cancer.


Evidence shows health support in the workplace can help prevent people falling out of work due to ill health. Remaining in work can have


Macmillan Cancer Support, registered charity in England and Wales (261017), Scotland (SC039907) and the Isle of Man (604). MAC15903_2017


a positive impact not only on wellbeing and helping to preserve livelihoods of those with long-term conditions, but also benefi ts organisations in retaining knowledgeable staff, as well as fostering a positive work culture and loyal workforce.


The building blocks of a good health and wellbeing at work strategy include policy, training and support programmes that raise awareness and address the needs of employees, and ensuring that relevant staff (such as line managers and HR) are equipped to support colleagues affected by cancer.


To fi nd out about the expert training, guidance and resources Macmillan provides, visit macmillan.org.uk/atwork You can also email the team at [email protected]macmillan.org.uk or call 020 7840 4725.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56